Feb
10

The Spanish Virgin Islands

We’d planned to set out early from Ponce, Puerto Rico and head east for the Spanish Virgins. The plan for the first day was to make a stop at the fuel dock to take on diesel then hop down the south coast of Puerto Rico and spend the night at Patilla. Fate intervened. As we were preparing to cast off a power outage put the fuel dock out of commission. After more than an hour of waiting we got a call from the fuel dock that they had rigged a generator so we filled up both the diesel tanks and motored out of the harbor. The wind was light and we got a few squalls along the way but pulled into Patilla an hour before sunset. There was a bit of southeast swell running that rolled right into the anchorage but we arrived too late to head anywhere else making for a very rolly night. We left early the next morning for Sun Bay on the south coast of Vieques where we thought that we might get some protection from the southeast swell. We were wrong. The swell was sneaking around the corner right into the anchorage. We decided to head down the coast to Ensenada Honda near the southeast corner of the island so we headed back out. Ensenada Honda is a remote spot that’s well protected by barrier islands but after looking at the chart closely we noted that there were several spots that you had to navigate around where the depth was six feet or less so we turned around again and headed back to Sun Bay. A rolly night being far superior to a night on the stones. The next day was Robin’s birthday and as the tradition on Mermaid we were underway. This time we were heading for Culebra. It was a nice sunny day and as we motorsailed along a big drop off along the south coast of Vieques we hooked a couple of nice barracudas before turning north for a nice sail to Culebra. Culebra is a great natural harbor. The large lagoon is protected by a ring of hills on three sides and by a reef on the other. We came through the well marked cut in the reef and dropped the hook in the calm waters of the lagoon. Culebra is very laid back and we took to it immediately. We enjoyed a wonderful birthday dinner with Sue and Rich along with other new cruising friends.

Many cruising boats make Culebra a stop on the way to the Eastern Caribbean island chain so we met a number of the boats passing through as well as a few that were long term residents. A favorite hang was the Dingy Dock Restaurant where a school of Tarpon swim along the dock waiting for handouts. We had a nice dingy raft up one evening and rented a golf cart and toured the island with some new cruiser friends Bruce and Tammy. We got in some very nice snorkeling and would have loved to spend more time there but the Christmas winds were starting to fill in so when we got a break in the winds we decided to head east to St. Thomas.

soon to be on the menu at the Dingy Dock on Culebra

soon to be on the menu at the Dingy Dock on Culebra

Tarpon at the dingy dock

Tarpon at the dingy dock

Robin checking out the tarpon

Robin checking out the tarpon

Robin and Tammy in the carrito

Robin and Tammy in the carrito

This tank was a target for bombing practice back in the day.

This tank was a target for bombing practice back in the day.

A new painter for the dingy

A new painter for the dingy

Robin heading out the bridge in Culebra

Robin heading out the bridge in Culebra

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Open some days closed others - that captures the pace of life on Culebra

Open some days closed others – that captures the pace of life on Culebra

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